Sony Cyber-shot RX100M2 and RX1R compact cameras officially announced

Sony-RX1R-camera
Sony-DSC-RX100M2-camera

Sony officially announced the Cyber-shot RX1R ($2,798.00) and RX100M2 ($748.00) compact cameras - check the key features of the new models at the bottom of this post. Several new accessories were also introduced:

Sony VFA-49R1 49mm filter adapter for RX100, RX100M2 and RX1R ($29.95):

  • Easy on/off with one-touch release
  • Receiver securely attaches to lens barrel
  • Using the VFA-49R1 adapter, now it is easy to expand the DSC-RX100/100M2’s shooting creativity by easily adding high-quality

Sony AG-R1 attachment grip for RX100/RX100M2 ($14.95):

  • Provides reliable and secure grip for active shooting
  • Durable rubber-like material
  • Easily attaches with double-sided tape

Sony-HVL-F43M-flash

Sony HVL-F43M TTL flash for Sony cameras: (Adorama):

  • High-power illumination (guide number: 43)
  • Longer effective range of over 30 ft. (10.5m)
  • The innovative “Quick Shift Bounce” system allows the HVL-F43M to orbit 90 degrees left and right, allowing you to maintain horizontal light distribution even when shooting vertically. In addition to pivoting side-to-side, the flash unit can also tilt down 8 degrees or back 150 degrees, ensuring customers the lighting freedom they need to capture that perfect shot.
  • Versatile bounce angles: 90° up, 90° left. This allows the flash head to be rotated while maintaining the set bounce angle, so you can quickly switch between horizontal and vertical format without changing the light angle.
  • The built-in bounce sheet can be used even when shooting in a vertical position without changing the angle of reflected light.
  • Auto white balance (signals color temp. to camera)
  • Auto zoom optimized for camera sensor size
  • Dust and Moisture resistant design: sealing materials are set at joints of outer materials (body, LCD panel, Mounting Foot etc.) and around movement/operating parts thereby increasing the life of your flash unit.
  • Modeling light capability allows the HVL-F43M to pulse, helping photographers determine where shadows will fall before taking the picture, so they can alter lighting or subject positioning as necessary.
  • Retractable wide-angle panel (15mm angle)
  • Wireless Ratio Control allows customers to wirelessly control up to three groups of flashes, as well as specify the luminosity ratio for each group, so they can enjoy multiple-flash lighting techniques without the need for special equipment or tedious exposure settings.
  • Simple controls, test button, power saving mode
  • TTL metering capability, high-speed sync
  • Fast recharging -- up to 38% quicker than HVL-F36

There is also a new "premium leather-like" case for RX-100 & RX-100M2 ($84.95)

Sony-RX1R-front

Sony-RX-1R-camera-features

Sony DSC-RX1R/B key features

24.3 MP 35 mm Full Frame Sensor

A whole new world of high-quality images are realized through the 24.3 MP effective 35 mm full-frame sensor, a normal sensor range of ISO 100 – 25600, and a sophisticated balance of high resolving power, gradation and low noise. The BIONZ®image processor enables up to 5 fps highspeed continuous shooting and 14-bit RAW image data recording.

DSC-RX1R: Ultimate resolution

The RX1R is a special edition of the RX1 for photographers who want to take full advantage of the sensor’s capabilities, and whose workflow normally includes computer based post-processing. The optical low-pass (anti-aliasing) filter that is built into the RX1 to minimize the occurrence of moiré and color artifacts has been removed from the RX1R, allowing the full resolution of the sensor to be achieved without compromise. The RX1R takes RX1 resolution to the limit.

Bright F2.0 Carl Zeiss®Sonnar T* lens

Carl Zeiss®lens expertise meets Sony optical precision in a sophisticated large-aperture lens that earns the coveted “Sonnar” name by offering remarkable brightness reminiscent of the sun. Whether taking casual snapshots, highly precise close-ups, or seriously composed landscapes and portraits, the Carl Zeiss Sonnar T* 35mm F2.0 fixed focal length lens ensures exceptional image quality.

Full HD 24p video and stereo input

Create movies of amazing clarity at Full HD resolution with manual control and stereo recording. Movies can be recorded at 60i for super smooth playback or 24p for a cinematic look. You can also use P/A/S/M modes to expand your moviemaking creativity. The DSC-RX1R Multiinterface shoe has been upgraded to record stereo sound when using the optional ECM-XYST1M external microphone.

Amazing Low-light performance

Experience incredible low-light shooting without a flash. The camera captures six images in a fraction of a second. Combining the data from all six, it creates a single image with a reduction in noise equivalent to two additional steps of ISO sensitivity. Sensitivity selectable up to ISO 25600. (Recommended for still subjects.)

High speed Auto Focus

Focus fast and accurate with high speed AF precision. To improve focusing speed and sensitivity, the Exmor®CMOS sensor uses its rapid throughput to deliver high-quality image signals to the camera’s BIONZ processor, which provides intelligent response data to a new high speed actuator motor in the lens. The result is fast, DSLR-like focusing speeds even in low light.

Full frame burst shooting

When subjects are moving quickly, you can capture the decisive moment by shooting continuously at 5 frames per second — while maintaining maximum image quality at full 24.3 effective megapixel (approx.) resolution made possible by the BIONZ®image processor.

Three control lens rings

Full manual operation is intuitive on the RX1. Users can keep their eyes on the subject and concentrate on the composition while comfortably adjusting the dedicated aperture, focusing, and macro switching rings.

Conveniently placed dials

Quick access to conveniently placed exposure compensation and focus mode dials.

TRILUMINOS Color

The DSC-RX1R support Sony’s proprietary TRILUMINOS Color technology, allowing you to experience photos and movies in rich, natural colors on any TV equipped with a TRILUMINOS Display. The expanded color gamut immerses you in those unforgettably colorful moments, from the complex shades in a shimmering blue sky to the delicate skin in a baby’s face.

Expressive Full HD movie recording

As when capturing photographs, you can take full advantage of the bright lens and sensitive 35mm full-frame sensor to create movies of breathtaking quality in various lighting. Movies are recorded at Full HD resolution (1920 x 1080 pixel) in the AVCHD Ver. 2.0 progressive format, and movies can be recorded at 60i or 60p for super smooth playback or 24p for a cinematic look, or other frame rates for other effects. Full-time continuous AF ensures clear results even when capturing fast-moving subjects. Moreover, Creative Style settings and Picture Effect expand your moviemaking creativity while P/A/S/M modes enable manual exposure control.

Customizable buttons personalize operation

For the ultimate in user-friendly operation, you can easily reassign five buttons to activate other functions you frequently use. These buttons (Custom, AEL and Left/Right/Down) can be reassigned to activate any of the following functions:

  • Drive mode, Flash mode, Autofocus Area, Face Detection, Smile Shutter, Auto Portrait Framing, Soft Skin Effect, ISO,
  • Metering mode, Flash Compensation, White Balance, DRO, Auto HDR, Creative Style, Picture Effect, Image Size, Quality,
  • Registration, AEL hold*, Spot AEL hold*, AEL toggle, Spot AEL toggle, AF/MF Control Hold*, AF/MF Control Toggle, Smart
  • Tele-converter, Zoom, Focus Magnifier, Aspect Ratio, Monitor Mute and Not set. * Cannot be assigned to left, right and down buttons.

Bright high-resolution display

The 3.0” (1,229k-dot) Xtra Fine LCD enhances shooting ease by displaying scenes with impressive brightness and accuracy. Brightness is boosted by the white pixels of WhiteMagic™ technology, while blacks are displayed blacker thanks to various

Sony technologies including an AR (anti-reflection) coating on the LCD surface and a layer of resin between the LCD and reinforced glass that together suppress light reflection even when shooting outdoors. An illumination intensity sensor also optimally adjusts brightness depending on your shooting environment.

Quick Navi simplifies navigation

Easier to navigate than conventional menus, Quick Navi lets you confirm current camera settings at a glance and promptly change settings with the cross keys and control dial/wheel. User-friendly icons further contribute to easy operation that doesn’t require looking into menus — a capability that especially comes in handy when using the optional viewfinder.

Memory Recall (MR) memorizes combined settings

Whenever you find a perfect combination of camera settings for a certain type of shooting situation, you can save it in memory by using the Memory Recall mode. Should a similar situation arise, you can immediately activate the saved combination via dial. This mode can memorize up to three groups of settings (including exposure modes, shutter speed, Drive mode, ISO, White Balance, Metering modes, etc.).

Grid lines support balanced compositions

You can display grid lines on the LCD to support more accurate horizontal and vertical alignment of the camera with walls, streets and other elements in your scene. There are three styles to choose from (Rule of 3rds Grid Line, Square Grid Line, and Diagonal + Square Grid Line). For extra assistance, the Dual-axis Digital Level Gauge can be used to check for camera roll and pitch.

Finer focusing via MF Assist and Peaking functions

During manual focusing, use MF Assist to enlarge the displayed image up to 11.7x (approx.) and more clearly see the results of your finest focusing adjustments. A Peaking function can also be activated to enable focusing confirmation at a glance by colorizing the most sharply focused areas.

More natural gradations through D-range Optimizer (DRO)

In difficult lighting conditions such as backlit scenes, DRO analyses and corrects your image in real time to achieve smoother, more natural gradations with more detail in the highlights and shadows that more closely match what you see with your naked eye. You can choose the amount of correction up to 5 steps and even apply DRO during continuous shooting to achieve better results during sports photography. Note: The effects of DRO vary depending on the scene and conditions.

White balance versatility for desired color tones

Auto White Balance (AWB) produces more natural colors by compensating for the type of lighting in your scene. The RX1/RX1R also provides a full range of white balance presets (Daylight, Incandescent, Fluorescent, etc.) a Color Temperature & Color Filter function, and Custom white balance adjustment options. You can even intuitively adjust white balance on a chart — in the amber-blue and green-magenta directions — during real-time monitoring of your scene* to achieve desired colors. * When a flash is used, the color tone can be adjusted after the image is shot.

Image Data Converter Ver. 4.2 RAW image development software

This powerful PC software provides advanced features for developing, editing and managing your 14-bit RAW (Sony ARW format) images. For example, you can expertly adjust exposure, white balance, tonal curves and more to match your creative intentions; convert the color space; save images in the JPEG, 16-bit TIFF and other formats; create thumbnail portfolios with image ratings; or apply Creative Style settings. The software can be downloaded for free from the Internet.

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Sony-RX100II-camera-features

Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-RX100M II key features

New 20.2 MP 1-inch Exmor R®Sensor

The world’s first 1.0” CMOS sensor featuring an Exmor R®image sensor technology. With this back-illuminated technology, the sensor doubles light sensitivity and combines with Sony’s Column A/D Conversion to reduce noise by half — a great help when photographing in dimly lit environments. Markedly reduced noise is evident even when high-sensitivity settings are used for capturing night landscapes or indoor scenes.

Carl Zeiss®T* F1.8 3.6x optical zoom

The large-diameter F1.8 Carl Zeiss®Vario-Sonnar T* lens delivers refined background defocusing (bokeh). A premium multilayered T* coating also dramatically reduces ghost and flare caused by light reflection.

Simple connectivity to smartphones via Wi-Fi®or NFC

Connectivity with smartphones for One-touch sharing/One-touch remote has been simplified with Wi-Fi®/NFC control. In addition to Wi-Fi support for connecting to smartphones, the DSC-RX100M2 also supports NFC (near field communication) - a first for Sony digital cameras - providing “touch connection” convenience when transferring images to Android™ smartphones and tablets. Users need only touch devices to connect; no complex set-up is required. Moreover, when using Smart Remote Control — a feature that allows shutter release to be controlled by a smartphone — connection between DSC-RX100MR and the smartphone can be established by simply touching devices.

Expanded ISO Sensitivity

With a new Exmor R®sensor that features the same adaptive noise reduction technology from Sony’s flagship SLT-A99V, the DSC-RX100M2 easily offers a wide range of sensitivity from ISO 160 to ISO 12800.

High speed Auto Focus

To improve focusing speed and sensitivity, the Exmor R®CMOS sensor uses its rapid throughput to deliver high-quality image signals to the camera’s BIONZ®processor, which provides intelligent response data to a new high speed actuator motor in the lens. The result is fast, DSLR-like focusing speeds even in low light.

Comfortable control ring for manual operation

A unique control ring around the lens works in combination with an intuitive, displayed user interface for meticulous SLRtype control over settings that satisfies even the most fastidious users. The control ring can be assigned to adjust various features (at various values) from basics like zooming and aperture to creative functions like Picture Effect. Moreover, it turns smoothly and seamlessly, allowing quiet, click-free usage while shooting movies including a new step-zoom function that enables instant selection of commonly used focal lengths.

Capture JPEG files, RAW files, or both

The DSC-RX100M2 saves pictures as compact JPEG files and/or ultra-high quality RAW files. RAW files save images prior to de-mosaicking, white balance, sharpness and color enhancement. This retains maximum latitude for enhancing the image on your PC.

New Multi Interface Shoe connector

Users can expand photographic and movie shooting possibilities by attaching optional accessories via the Multi Interface Shoe, including an electronic viewfinder, powerful external flash and stereo microphone. You can also connect with a compatible remote control via Multi Terminal.

Full HD Movies at 60p/60i/24p

Capture HD Movies in your choice of super-smooth 60p, standard 60i or cinematic 24p, all at Full HD 1920x1080 resolution. AVCHD™ codec delivers stunning picture quality. MP4 codec offers smaller files for easier upload to the web.

Tiltable 3.0” Xtra Fine LCD™

The tiltable 3” (1,229k dots) Xtra Fine™ LCD Display makes it easy to photograph over crowds or low to capture pets eye to eye by swinging up approx. 84° and down approx. 45°. Easily scroll through menus and preview life thanks to WhiteMagic™ technology that dramatically increases visibility in bright daylight. The large display delivers brilliant-quality still images and movies while enabling easy focusing operation.

Auto Object Framing

Give your photos a professional look with Auto Object Framing. Featuring advancements like exceptional two-person portrait capability along with Face Detection and Tracking Focus, Auto Object Framing not only turns ordinary photos into stunning compositions but does so automatically recognizing the scene then cropping accordingly.

Expanded ISO Sensitivity

With a new Exmor R®sensor that features the same adaptive noise reduction technology from Sony’s flagship SLT-A99V, the DSC-RX100M2 easily offers a wide range of sensitivity from ISO 160 to ISO 12800.

Customizable function button

Assign up to seven different functions to the function button, to allow quick access to your most frequently used functions.

Optical SteadyShot®with 3-way Active Mode

Optical SteadyShot® image stabilization reduces shake and blur by countering camera movements in both horizontal and vertical directions. Active 3-Way stabilization adds digital rolling control that counters clockwise and anti-clockwise rotation, resulting in more stable videos even at long focal lengths. Active 3-Way stabilization adds digital rolling controlthat counters clockwise and anti-clockwise rotation, resulting in more stable videos even at long focal lengths.

Auto HDR mode

Captures more scene dynamic range than a single exposure can handle—and more range than photo film. Combines the best highlight detail from one shot, the best mid-tones from a second and the best shadow detail from a third for one incredible shot (up to 6 EV stops). Captures in a split second. (Recommended for still subjects.)

Face Detection/ Registration technology

The camera can automatically detect and register up to eight individual faces and adjust focus, exposure, white balance and flash to help deliver crisp, properly lit images of family and friends. Can prioritize children or adults

Multi-aspect ratio recording for still images

Capture still images in any of four aspect ratios — 1:1, 2:3, 4:3, or 16:9 (vertical to horizontal). This provides the freedom to choose a ratio that matches the scene or the specific shooting purpose.

3.6x optical/7.2x Clear Image digital zoom

Most digital zooms use electronic cropping to get closer to the subject, resulting in unsharp images. With Clear Image Zoom the powerful processor compares patterns found in adjacent pixels and creates new pixels to match selected patterns, resulting in more realistic, higher-quality images. Clear Image Zoom digitally doubles optical zoom for closer photos.

Picture Effect mode

Realize your creative potential with Picture Effect, a fun and simple way to convert ordinary landscapes and portraits that come to life by heightening mood and emphasizing certain attributes. Effects are Soft Focus, Posterization, Retro Photo,

High Contrast Monochrome, Rich-tone Monochrome, Miniature, Soft High-key, Toy Camera, Pop Color, Partial Color, Watercolor Painting, HDR Painting, and Illustration.

Creative Style settings

Control how the camera processes your images with six finishing styles: Standard, Vivid, B&W, Sunset, Portrait and Landscape. You can even fine-tune contrast, saturation, and sharpness to your personal taste.

Sony RX100M2 sample videos:

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  • madmax

    Two good but way overpriced cameras. RX100 for $500 and RX1 for $1400 would be adequate pricing. RX100 with a tiltable screen is now a much more reasonable deal, nothwithstanding, but lens is still too slow at long end.

    • Ufupuw

      RX1 for $1400? You must be smoking pot. A full frame Carl Zeiss F2.0 lens itself is usually over $2000

      • Lee Mullen

        stfu

      • fjfjjj

        Pot? You must be drinking Budweiser.

      • John Doe

        And what? You are talking about a lens you can use with different bodies. With the RX1 you are stuck to that body and when you want to sell it in a few years, it probably won’t be worth half of the money. Do you work for Sony?The RX1 is a total rip off.

        • ethan

          yet i will have all those excellent rx1 photos while everyone else shoots with what? something of lesser quality. im sure you can go buy a d600 with the same sensor and comparable lens for a little bit more, but i guarantee that the rx1 owner will have more day to day use out of their camera. having a camera with you at all times is more important than flexibility or resale value. at least to some people who realize that

          • longzoom

            I tend to agree. On one hand, the D600 + sig 35/1.4 is gonna deliver quality of first rate. Add 70-200/4, and you almost done. On the other one, the RX 1 is so small! Choice is not so clear for some, torture…

        • ethan

          also as i recall, 5d2 was released at 2700 new and now sold at 1400 or less used. you dont even get a lens with it. i guess rx1 will suffer right?

        • nameless

          Interchangeability adds value, but it doesn’t reduce manufacturing cost. FF camera cost about 2k, without a lens. $1400 is a price for an APS-C camera, body only.

    • El Aura

      I think you are confusing value with what your would be willing to pay for it.

      • madmax

        True. Value about $1000-1200 is much more reasonable.

        • handsomer

          Good luck finding used RX-1 for that money. No, I don’t think you can find one, not before 5 years from now.

          • madmax

            I just don´t need a camera without a viewfinder nor a tilting screen. Also lacks a decent grip. No good enough. At $2800 is nonsense but at $1000 plus optional viewfinder ($500) plus optional grip ($75) it could be a deal, but not better than competition at this price point.

    • Toli

      in general speaking… Sony is over pricing on their products and will have a hard time to competing with Canikon. I only get Sony thru redemption without paying out from pockets money… :)

      • anon

        Their cameras are actually cheaper(specs/price). It’s the accessories and lenses that are overpriced.

        • Toli

          Anon, look at A99 @$2800 to comparing with other FF makers as lower price as well as new RX1 in the compact body and people having a hard time to justify that unless, they have money to burn (like Bill Gate)… my friend… ;-)

  • lollus

    Two ridiculously priced cams with kindergarden menu-based handling. These are toys for the tech-fashion conscious, cameras are something else.

    • Ufupuw

      It’s been exactly 1 year and RX100 prices have not come down even a few dollars on Amazon. That only happens when the company is moving stocks quickly and see no reason to drop prices.

      Apparently, vast majority of photographers are contradicting you with their wallets.

      • Lee

        How do big/quick sales contradict lollus’ point? The fact that it sells more like an iPhone than a D4 actually pretty well proves his point that it IS more like an iPhone than a D4.

      • Lee

        How do big/quick sales contradict lollus’ point? The fact that it sells more like an iPhone than a D4 actually pretty well proves his point that it IS more like an iPhone than a D4.

        • anon

          Ufupuw’s talking about price, that nobody buys overpriced product(“ridiculously priced”). But the sales are good so far. So, that’s a bit contradictory.

      • lollus

        My friend, the world is full of people with more money than judgement. The handling of those products is still awful, and there are better products at lower prices. Their prices have not dropped you say? Even worse, they are certainly not going to see my money.

        • Ufupuw

          Funny aside from sales,, vast majority of photography websites loved both these cameras , RX1 receiving Gold award on DPReview and RX100 receiving compact camera of the year from imaging-resources.

          Your problem is that you are shoving your own judgment down everyone else’s throat,

          • lollus

            You see, kid-with-a-funny-name, I write what I think, and I have 1) the right and 2) the knowledge to do so. You go on trusting your “independent” websites and awards if you like, but you could as well learn something from people like me… I am selling used toilet paper with a large sensor, are you interested? Do you think that will improve your photography?

          • Ufupuw

            You see lull, funny name, let me repeat: these two are regarded as the best cameras of 2012 by vast majority of independent reviewers who have used these cameras.

            If you don’t agree with them, that’s just fine, but that doesn’t mean only your opinion is right, and everyone else is wrong. You are entitled to your opinion, even though it’s hilariously wrong opinion contradicted by vast majority of photographers.

          • lollus

            Go on peabrain, you amuse me…

          • Meanwhile …..

            Wow, trolls run out of steam quick these days.

  • Lee Mullen

    zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz

  • bdZ203

    test

    • bdZ203

      Hmm… If it were up to my lower back, I would hock ALL my equipment and get the RX1-R! (D90, 105mm, 70-300mm, Tokina 11-16mm, 35mm, 18-105 kit and Manfrotto tripod/head) But I would too dearly miss all the flexibility… So, instead, I’m thinking seriously about the RX100M2 which should still be entirely acceptable as an all-day carry-around. The hot shoe and EVF option has sold me! And the demo video was pretty impressive… It is a Cybershot, after all! LOL

      • El Cantante

        I understand what you mean. I myself invested a lot in Nikon gear (D7000, D600, 40/2.8dx, 60/2.8, 105/2.8, 16-35/4, 24-120/4, 70-200/4, etc) but I must admit that I didn’t touch all that good stuff for weeks now and just use my RX100. It is really a huge advantage to have a good, small camera with you all the time.

        But to be honest, I’m not very happy with Sony’s obvious politic to not make any improvements to the current RX100 via firmware updates (and some improvements are really needed!) and instead hope that we just buy the new M2.

        Unfortunately Nikon is not better in this regard (e.g. by artificially crippling the D600 so you buy a second body for this and third for that, or at least that what they seem to hope) I think, at the end I’ll just sell all my current gear and move to Fuji’s X100s (I rarely use the zoom on the RX100) and maybe later on to their exchangeable lens X-System. It looks like Fuji is the only company right now that do not constantly try to sell you new gear, but also improve the gear you already have via firmware upgrades and actually give you real value for the money.

        • http://genotypewritings.blogspot.com/ genotypewriter

          I don’t know if you were in to cameras when Sony brought out the Nex line but some of the best-loved features of the Nex line, such as focus peaking and manual exposure in video, etc. were features that were introduced via firmware upgrades to existing cameras (e.g. Nex-5). And don’t forget the LA-E2 type PDAF adapters which are genius. Plus there are plenty of lens firmware updates if you check in the Sony support site too.

          Look at Olympus’s flagship OM-D E-M5… it doesn’t even have focus peaking although they started the mirrorless revolution. And as much as I like Fuji, their Hybrid OVF is essentially a gimmick… most users tend to use the rear LCD when composition matters because the Hybrid OVF is not reliable… ask around.

          So it’s a bit unfair to imply that Fuji is the only manufacturer that releases firmware updates.

          • El Cantante

            No I wasn’t aware of that. Thanks! RX100 is my first camera from Sony.

            But still, unfortunately, fairness is something that you can’t count on (anymore) nowadays in this over-commercialized world. Or was it fair from Nikon to reduce the price of the D600 by a significant amount only a few weeks after its introduction? I made the mistake of trusting Nikon and buying one of the first samples, stupid me. Now I can’t sell my D600 without a big loss.

            Is it fair that Nikon reserves even the simplest, but in daily usage badly needed firmware features only to its D4? I’m talking about trivial things like one-click 100% zoom in playback mode to check focus (even my much cheaper RX100 can do that) or the ability to assign ISO to the movie button which is located directly near the shutter button in recent models, but otherwise absolutely useless for still photographers like me because it can’t be re-programmed to do anything else, except on the D4 AFAIK.

            Yes, Nikon DSLRs have also a dedicated ISO button. But for some nasty reason they insist in placing it in the worst place one can think of in all of their models, including D800/D3S/D4. The crazy thing is, they seem to be fully aware of this because on the D4 they offer the possibility to assign the ISO to the movie button which is positioned in the perfect place for ISO. For all other models they offer the so-called “easy ISO” feature that lets you use the rear dial in A- and S-Modes to adjust ISO. But this does not work on M-Mode that I mainly use.
            And don’t let me even start about not offering the 1/8000 shutter speed in the D600, or the usage of an AF-module for the D600, that was designed for an APS-C sensor and nearly useless on a FF body and so on and so forth.

            Why do they do such stupid things? In the forums lots of Nikon owners will tell you that it is because Nikon have “learned” from the D700 and are trying to avoid that their cheaper models cannibalize the sales of their top of the line models. Steve Jobs said once: “If you don’t cannibalize yourself, someone else will!”.

            That’s one of the reasons why ALL of my Nikon gear will be very soon on eBay, making place for Fuji’s X-System.

            As you see, I have good reasons to be paranoid about Sony’s intentions. If time proves that I’m wrong, I’ll be the first to apologize. But the signs are there!

          • http://genotypewritings.blogspot.com/ genotypewriter

            There really is no end the list of things that “should” be there. Also, there’s no one camera that can solve all problems… e.g. compacts vs. DSLRs. So at any rate you will need to have more than one camera system if you want most of your shooting needs met.

      • El Cantante

        I understand what you mean. I myself invested a lot in Nikon gear (D7000, D600, 40/2.8dx, 60/2.8, 105/2.8, 16-35/4, 24-120/4, 70-200/4, etc) but I must admit that I didn’t touch all that good stuff for weeks now and just use my RX100. It is really a huge advantage to have a good, small camera with you all the time.

        But to be honest, I’m not very happy with Sony’s obvious politic to not make any improvements to the current RX100 via firmware updates (and some improvements are really needed!) and instead hope that we just buy the new M2.

        Unfortunately Nikon is not better in this regard (e.g. by artificially crippling the D600 so you buy a second body for this and third for that, or at least that what they seem to hope) I think, at the end I’ll just sell all my current gear and move to Fuji’s X100s (I rarely use the zoom on the RX100) and maybe later on to their exchangeable lens X-System. It looks like Fuji is the only company right now that do not constantly try to sell you new gear, but also improve the gear you already have via firmware upgrades and actually give you real value for the money.

      • http://genotypewritings.blogspot.com/ genotypewriter

        Some people use phone cameras as their “all-day carry-arounds” too. So it really depends on how much you’re willing to compromise for convenience.

        • bdZ203

          genotype and elcantante…

          You’re absolutely right! Honestly, it’s just that I am in the market for something light-weight. I realize how much I will be losing out on by just carrying around a compact… Hopefully, this will be tempered by the fact that at least I will HAVE a camera ON ME…

          I’m not necessarily a “fan boy” for Sony… I just like the fact that it’s so capable in a small form factor, and the price is “right”… I probably would be just as happy with an EM-5, NEX, Fuji, Coolpix A or even a GX-1 – but those options are mostly all more expensive, and most just put me into a “need a new-lens” category again, and that is something I want to avoid.

          Since I can’t bring myself to actually sell my Nikon gear, sadly, the decision is just as much a financial one as anything else at this point… I posted here hoping to get some feedback, so thanks!

          I am pretty knowledgeable about what’s out there for options, but honestly, after a while I just get overwhelmed… Also, I am NOT knowledgeable about which cameras work or clash with my Mac software… Oh, and that reminds me: I had pretty much decided YEARS ago that the Nikon V1 was “right” for me… But the salesman basically made me feel foolish for even considering one… His view was that the IQ was completely lacking, and he didn’t see all the other features like AF speed, burst rate, slow motion and built-in intervalometer as anything special. I allowed him to change my mind because I was thinking I would just end up carrying my lenses around anyway…

          The new RX100 just seems to me like a sensible balance of price and features. It keeps me away from the issue of more lenses, it is truly a compact and it has an EVF option – which I can decide whether is something I “need” after I’ve used the display on its own for a while…

          I have used several good, but less-capable Cybershots in the past and had little issue with no real viewfinders. Reading all these forums got me to wondering whether I could go back to no viewfinder after 3+ years with a DSLR… LOL, I know – pathetic!

          So, maybe it’s already too late and maybe I come off as clueless and incapable of making a decision… But I don’t think that’s the problem. I would like to believe that I have put off for so long getting a compact because I need to know my money is being spent well.

          I read these forums looking for answers, but often (not always) I end up with more questions than answers.

          • http://genotypewritings.blogspot.com/ genotypewriter

            You can’t always replace cameras… especially when they’re of different format sizes. You need to keep them around and take out whatever that’s appropriate for the outing.

          • bdZ203

            I totally agree! I only consider selling from time to time for budget reasons. But I know I would end up regretting it, so I will probably never sell. (My defunct electronics around the house will prove that!) LOL

          • El Cantante

            If you won’t miss the 450mm your 70-300mm gives you on the tele side and the 16,5mm from your Tokina on the wide side, then something like the RX100II could in fact be used as the only camera, especially if you add to it a VF which I personally miss a lot in my RX100. But all in all, it is an excellent camera.

            Yes the decision is tough and the choices are huge. What helped me with my decision was to create a list of things I can’t go without and then see what cameras in my price range offer all of them. The Fuji X-E1 won and I just ordered it today :-). Beside the compact size and the excellent IQ, the killer feature for me was the retro-style and I don’t mean only the look and feel. My first SLR was a Minolta SRT-101b (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minolta_SR-T_101) which I used for more than 15 years before I switched to digital and I miss that shooting experience. Fuji’s X-System seems to deliver exactly that.

            I wish you good luck with whatever choice you make.

          • El Cantante

            hmm..the above link was messed up. here it is again:

            en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minolta_SR-T_101

          • bdZ203

            I did the same thing… Had a Nikon N series for 15 years (my current 70-300 is from back then)

            That Minolta is beautiful! And I, too LOVE the X series… And I will be making a pro/con list to help me decide! Thanks!

  • fjfjjj

    I’m annoyed by how the RX1 feels like a prototype. Where’s my professional handling, Sony? RX1R looks no better.

    • http://genotypewritings.blogspot.com/ genotypewriter

      Except for noise, which is obviously better compared to comparable APS-C options, the original RX1′s image quality is really subpar. Even then, by putting a FF sensor in such a compact camera what Sony did was not just a great trick but a game changing thing. As gear lovers everyone should be thankful for it. So, making it the subject of a poorly thought out joke like “professional handling” is really in very poor taste.

      • Guest

        Not joking.

      • fjfjjj

        Not joking. My little Fujis handle quite well.

        • http://genotypewritings.blogspot.com/ genotypewriter

          My Galaxy Note II lets me take handwritten notes, phone calls and takes decent pictures too. By your logic I should be attacking the RX1 too. Also, I’ve said this a thousand times… people who are passionate about photography use whatever it takes to get the shots they envision without whining about how something feels in their hands, over their shoulders or on their backs:
          http://www.flickr.com/photos/genotypewriter/galleries/72157629198858207/

          The RX1 was a big step for all camera users because Sony showed how it’s done. Don’t knock it because you just want to keep your cash in your wallet, stay at home and not take pictures.

          • fjfjjj

            No doubt it was a big step. It still feels like a prototype to me. Crappy manual, crappy grip, crappy menus. The way a camera feels and operates has a lot to do with its quality as a tool.

            If you think money is my reason for complaining, you’re wrong. RX1, bought and sold.

    • madmax

      Sadly true.

  • RMan

    The RX100M2 looks really good. The performance of the old RX100 sensor was impressive already and if it is true that the new one is even better by a whole stop in low light performance then that’s more than great. Also the ability to use a Viewfinder with the M2 is just fantastic.

    But I’m still wondering if they have fixed some of the annoyances of the old RX100 like the missing Bulb mode (I really really miss this ) and the slowness when turning the camera on, off or reviewing images. Decent documentation would also be nice (I had to google out lots of stuff because the supplied “manual” with the RX100 was basically a joke).

  • sasa208

    utterly boring

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