Sony QX100 and QX10 promo video leaked few hours before the official announcment

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The promo video for the Sony QX100 and QX10 lens camera modules for smart phones is now available on YouTube few hours before the official announcement:

Via The Verge

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  • visionaer

    what kind of mischief

  • fjfjjj

    That does NOT look like “easy and quick attachment.” Look at him shaking and fumbling. He does look like a hipster doofus though, so maybe it all evens out.

    • abluesky

      I agree – not-so-easy and quick attachment.

  • abluesky

    The concept for these cameras are GREAT. Personally, I’ve often wanted to use my iPhone as touch screen interface for my cameras.

    I’m in line to purchase one AFTER upgrading to a RICOH GR.

    What I would really like to see is either this Sony System or a WIFI SD card system transmit in RAW.

  • Διαμα ντιδης

    Seems like putting a leica lens in front of a holga. Pointless

    • kassim

      It has 1″ sensor… bigger than most compacts. So maybe not a holga after all.

      • Adam Sanford

        Agree with Kassim. The IQ from this will obliterate camera phones, even the super high resolution ones — larger sensor and a true optical zoom.

        If this didn’t take pictures 2-3 *generations* ahead of camera phone technology, Sony never would have made these.

        I’m not sold on the concept or ergonomics of this, but I have zero doubt it will take very, very good pictures.

  • http://1000wordpics.blogspot.ca/ 1000wordpics

    The ad campaign has doomed this product. People had legit questions about the benefit/drawbacks to carrying an extra gizmo along with your smartphone. “Who else but hipsters are going to use this?” they asked, maybe fairly, maybe unfairly. And predictably… the marketing falls right into that trope.

    • Bill

      if you ask me whether to carry the Galaxy Zoom or this Sony Lens… I’ll definitely go for the later without second thoughts. You see, people are wanting to have greater image quality to be available on their mobiles, since it will be hard to make it into reality (great lens, long zoom and slim phone only exist in dream) so Sony go for the other approach: separating them instead of merging them into a bulky phone. So you get the option to carry one only when you need it. Again people can argue if you don’t carry it with you all the time then there’s no point about it. but i sure think this concept is great and we might be seeing others doing the same soon. Will I buy one? probably not, i’m more than happy with the image quality of my iphone for the moment.

      • http://1000wordpics.blogspot.ca/ 1000wordpics

        That’s the problem. “Good enough” Once smartphones starting using BSI sensors, the image quality became “good enough” for many people. The bar to get them to move got higher. It’s an interesting product, for sure, but it’s definitely “Sony-like”… almost high tech for the sake of being high tech.

  • Adam Sanford

    It’s so easy to mock this, but here goes Sony, innovating again. (And I’m a Canon guy saying this…)

    Sony are banking on people (a) wanting much better IQ than what their phones can deliver, (b) wanting to share those pics immediately rather than downloading to their home computers, and (c) *not* ponying up the money for phone-bandwidth-using point-and-shoots or SLRs.

    Step back from the idea as they’ve designed it for just a second, and tell me that the above 3 points are not *dead*-on-target for today’s photo + social-media obsessed world.

    This idea — or something like it — will take off in a big way.

  • Danonino

    Sorry people, No Raw. Epic FAIL for Sony.

    • Adam Sanford

      The target demographic for this product are not people who do serious post-processing. They are aiming for the instagram youth, who will be just tickled to capture sharp concert photos, regardless of format.

      Only serious photo enthusiasts use the RAW format.

      Again, I don’t necessarily like these specific Sony designs, but the JPG call seems a practical one that the target audience won’t care about.

  • DP

    I look forward to never seeing that guy again, but I think they pointed out a lot of pluses in that spot. Pluses, for the intended audience, of course!

    Being able to take off the lens and aim it at cats? At yourself? Edit directly on your phone and upload to social media? Perfect for the target audience!

    Whole thing looks awkward though, and I agree they didn’t do enough to hide that (if you believe that commercials for products should hide awkwardness related to using those products). At about 0:13, instead of holding the product still, they should have used freeze frames, otherwise it looks like it takes too long (and maybe it does).

    Other than that, maybe this is a step-up camera for those who would never get a DSLR because they love their phones too much?

    • Adam Sanford

      Replace ‘cats’ with ‘the stage at a concert’ and you see where Sony is leaning. This will work with the Instagram kids, though I’m still not married to this specific idea.

      Canon also has the sharing-friendly Powershot N (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lolhdVLMyHs) — it is like a point and shoot without a traditional ergonomic setup — it’s meant to take on weird angles as well. Also one-touch sharing with facebook and all that.

      Neither Sony nor Canon give the complete ‘sharing generation’ experience, but they take much better pictures than a phone can, and they are easy to share to social networks.

  • Doobie Keebler

    What is with their facial hair? Terrible.

  • Orestor

    More like “go retarded”

  • bob2

    Could the geek be more skinny? What does he have–twigs for arms? Could he be paler? Could they have at least gotten a stylist to comb his bad haircut and fugly facial hair? I sure would not want to be associated with this contraption.

  • Robert Mark

    Hold that pose — give me 45 seconds to take my lens out of its case and assemble my camera, sync with my smartphone, and launch my app. Just another minute… almost done. There we go, looks great. Hey, where’d you go?

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