Film is not dead: Adox is building a new factory to produce photographic film, paper and chemicals


Adox has begun the construction of a new factory where they will produce photographic film, paper and chemicals (Adox film is available for sale at B&H):



The new facility is in addition to those recently acquired in Marley, Switzerland (Adox has acquired Ilford's film machines).
Adox is the latest company to expand their photographic film production - see the recent news from

Adox is the latest company to expand their photographic film production - see the recent news from Bergger, Ferrania and Kodak.

Via DSLR Magazine

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  • MB

    Good to know that the main thing, parking space for Porsche, has been reserved!

  • Jeffry De Meyer

    Now I’m wondering what it would have been like if development of film had never stopped.

    • Spy Black

      Sometimes I wish digital had never happened, both for film and audio.

      • obican

        In audio, analog is usually and objectively better than digital but you can’t always say the same thing about photography.

        • Spy Black

          That’s not really why I made that comment. There was something about the tangible nature of the mediums that I loved, even if they could be problematic.

          • obican

            As someone who still shoots film extensively, I’m glad that digital happened. I’m actually glad that digital music happened too, makes good music so much easier to reach by piracy :D. You just go and buy the LP later.

        • CHD

          If you feel that way then you’ve never listened to a Hi-Res file through a quality DAC.

          • obican

            I actually have, many many times as I have daily access to such a system.

    • Thylmuc

      well, my suspicion would be that it would still be on par with sensor resolutions. It feels somehow physical….

    • sperdynamite

      I mean the Portra films just aren’t that old. Even if there was no digital they would still be state of the art. They just might have more variation in tone and contrast than what’s currently available. Ektachrome will likely be a new formulation.

  • CHD

    I’m still not buying into this whole ‘film’s not dead’ thing. I would bet a lot of money that the majority of current film users are probably those who are younger and never grew up with it. Yes…I’m saying it’s a fad. Hopefully I’m wrong as options are always good but I think it won’t be long before we see a decline in film again.

    • My point was that at least three companies announced new film products in the last few weeks.

      • Thylmuc

        which may turn out just a little bit too many companies. Will Ferrania be able to survive with pressure on both the slide film side (Kodak) and the b/w film side (Adox)?
        worst case scenario: Ferrania has to give up just a couple of months before Kodak finds out that the Ektachrome idea did not work out in the scale they (Kodak) needed, and stops the production again.

    • Jeffry De Meyer

      If those companies don’t think they will become a major success story and keep their capacity at sane levels there is no reason why a company like that can’t survive from a small scale market.

      People spend loads of money on old cars that don’t offer the same levels of comfort as modern ones and cost more in fuel and maintenance. Same holds true for chemical photography.

      It is not for me, I spent time in the darkroom messing around with stinking chemicals wasting boat loads of time and love the fact that I don’t have to any longer.

      • CHD

        ‘It is not for me, I spent time in the darkroom messing around with
        stinking chemicals wasting boat loads of time and love the fact that I
        don’t have to any longer.’

        You just made my point…the majority of us who grew up with film feel the same way. I think there will be enough of a demand for a niche market but I think what we are seeing right now is primarily a surge in demand with the younger generation where film is more of a novelty.

        • sperdynamite

          Then why are the top rated/highest billing wedding professionals in the USA primarily film shooters? Are they just melinials playing around?

          • Zos Xavius

            That’s because they offer a service few do. Film is physical. People like that.

          • eric

            digital is just as physical as film if you actually make prints with it. i think digital looks better than film on prints.

        • tornwald

          In my experience it is not a surge. Almost all my fellow professionals I know shoot almost entirely on medium format film or on large format film.
          They grew up using film and never switched to digital for obvious reasons: It is still far better looking, it’s very reliable and it is far cheaper for most people who demand the highest quality.

          For the same reasons, many of the worlds best filmmakers also still shoot on film:
          Bela Tarr, Hou Hsiao Hsien, Tarantino, Woody Allen, Darren Aronofsky, P.T. Anderson and perhaps most famouly: Christopher Nolan.

          • CHD

            Woody Allen…really??? You almost had a valid argument….

          • tornwald

            If that’s the best argument you can make after 2 weeks of hard thinking 🙂

            But you are right, mentioning Bela Tarr alone would have proven my point already.

          • CHD

            2 weeks of hard thinking?? Hardly…some of us have other things to do besides sitting on Disqus all day.

          • tornwald

            And yet, here we are again.

          • CHD

            Yes, there you are again replying mins after I post something…get a life

          • tornwald

            O hello. To bad you are not willing to comment to valid arguments other people make and instead react frustrated and pigheaded.

          • CHD

            So Woody Allen is a valid argument??

    • sperdynamite

      Lucky for us you don’t need to buy it for it to be true. Digital has made people who actually care about the art and craft of photography seek out a medium that requires more effort and has more limitations. It seems counter productive but vinyl didn’t come back until the CD was basically completely replaced by digital files. Keep in mind there is no one solution for every photographer. And few film photographers never shoot digital. But I would hate to think that the analog choice will ever completely go away. With b&w frankly I think it never will. It’s like any other art medium. It’ll be serviced and supported by its own enthusiasts.

      I just bought a new F6 and I use it at my weddings. Film ain’t dead.

      • CHD

        Vinyl is making a comeback for the same reason as film….basically younger people who never lived through it’s shortcomings the first time around. By the way…I like vinyl I’m just sayin:)

        • sperdynamite

          What you refer to as shortcomings are really just situationally based advantages or disadvantages. I can and do make the opposite argument which is that younger people today who didn’t grow up in the analog era know all too well the shortcomings of digital ephemerality. This always gets distilled down to whether one is argueing that film will make some “comeback” or whether it should be used in spaces where digital is clearly the correct choice. Film doens’t need to make a comeback, it only needs to continue being available and relevant to those who choose it.

    • eric

      i would agree. i think its a fad. but i also think film can thrive as a niche market for certain people who want to do that. ironically, i see a lot of people who upload scans of their film on social media anyways, so how much is it really about film and how much is it about the look of film. digital is the future in my opinion. and the majority of digital cameras today can produce equal if not better photos than 35mmfilm when blown up as actual prints.

  • ZMWT

    It is not about film; market needs more capable and more modern film cameras. Relying on what’s been produced up to 20 years ago, makes film market overall dated. Film revival therefore can go only as far as there is new and good film cameras people want to use (and not only boring Lomo cams).

    • Zos Xavius

      There are plenty of 30-40 year old SLRs working just fine. Also a lot of the medium format gear seems to be holding up because they were built to last. It is a problem though but I do the think it’s a massive one currently. The success of the m42 bessa a few years ago should show that it’s still possible and profitable for companies to make modern SLRs

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