New “Reflex” all manual film SLR camera to launch on Kickstarter later this month


Reflex is another upcoming Kickstarter project for an all manual film SLR camera (see also the upcoming Yashica and JCH film cameras). Expect the funding to start somewhere at the end of October. The Reflex website has only a blur of the camera (see above) but I was able to find also this additional drawing:


It is not clear what lens mount will be used for the Reflex camera. Some scanned sample pictures taken with a prototype can be found on Instagram:

Via Thephoblographer

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  • Oz Baz

    Good on them for giving it a go! This is a bit like the early days of photography. A number of small cottage industry sized manufacturers catering to enthusiasts. Mechanical cameras are so complex and precise. It will be a challenge but I wish them success

    • Spy Black

      I wonder if the lighr leaks will be a hipster feature in these cameras…

      • I wonder if the camera will come with an enema kit for old a$$holes.

  • Carla Mahl Kelly

    I have no idea what the specs are for this camera, but some of the best film cameras ever made were the Pentax Spotmatic and K1000. Plenty of working models can be had cheaply on eBay; why reinvent the wheel?

    • Oz Baz

      Good point. However they are slowly breaking down and wearing out. Due to the film revival the price of film cameras is going up. If you want a new film slr you can buy the Nikon FM10 or the F6

      • Spy Black

        …wirh decades of evolutionary design built right in to the FM10 and F6 as well. I’m surprised Nikon doesn’t advertise these models around film buff circles. They could probably offload a good chunk of them.

        • silmasan

          I get a feeling that any nikon may be too pedestrian/commoner for those so called “film buff” circles. :-p

          • Robert Falconer

            Quite the opposite, actually.

          • silmasan

            Oh good, I must’ve confused them with hipsters flaunting some obscure cameras.. 🙂

      • Zos Xavius

        I really doubt the F6 is still in production. I’d be willing to bet they are just selling off old stock.

        • Mistral75

          Nikon was still producing the F6 in 2014 and Cosina the FM10 in 2015.

          • Zos Xavius

            Interesting. I wonder what demand has been like. It is kind of hard to justify the cost for most people I would imagine.

          • Mistral75

            Concerning the F6, it is said two persons (part time) manufactured (on demand) around 50 units per month at the Sendai plant.

          • Spy Black

            … in some unknown period of time. Which for a camera like this makes sense. The production gear is kept up and ready, probably at some minimal expense to overall production of Nikon products.

      • Mistral75
        • Zos Xavius

          $2,700 is kind of rough really. You could buy some really nice film MF cameras for that. Hell, you could buy a system for that much money these days.

          • silmasan

            Mints can be found for $800-1000 though.

          • “MINT” is synonymous with “NEVER SERVICED”

          • Mistral75

            On-demand, fully manual assembly…

          • Not quite. The FM10 was discontinued on July 20th. Nikon hasn’t built a fully manual camera for decades. The FM10 was built by Cosina who also has stopped building manual cameras.

          • Spy Black

            Yeah but film MF is HEAVY. Try carrying around one all day. If you want to seriously do film and want new, you can’t beat this. The F6 will work a with a fair amount of modern lenses as well.

          • Mistral75

            > The F6 will work a with a fair amount of modern lenses as well.

            Unfortunately it won’t work with the so-called E lenses with electromagnetic command of the aperture, nor with the AF-P lenses.

          • Spy Black

            Yes, not all, but a fair amount of them. 😉 The bottom line is the F6 is really the only game in town if you want a new film camera for serious film work.

          • Depends on your definition of serious. I’d say that the F6 (which is really just old stock) or a Leica M7 or MP are your only choices for 35mm. That’s not much and they’re all quite pricey.

      • The FM10 was discontinued this past July, shortly after Cosina discontinued the Zeiss Ikon and Voigtlander Bessa series. These cameras were all variations on the same core components. It’s generally agreed upon that Nikon hasn’t built a new F6 for many years and are simply selling old stock.

    • Zos Xavius

      Parts for those cameras are nearly impossible to find without just cannibalizing more cameras. Its only a matter of time before none of those cameras will work anymore and there won’t be any way to repair them. That day is getting closer by the minute.

      • Robert Falconer

        Nope. There are copious volumes of film cameras in circulation. Many of the better fully mechanical ones can still be repaired or serviced, assuming they haven’t already been well maintained over their lives.

        There’s just no need for a new 35mm camera.

        • Zos Xavius

          Sure there is. Plenty of cameras are starting to suffer from age related defects. Unless you go back to the all manual, all mechanical cameras of the 60s and previously, and those cameras are rarer yet. Good working examples are not exactly cheap and plentiful. Sure there are millions of k1000s out there. How many don’t have viewfinder separation and gummed up mirror mechanisms? Most need work and parts. The added electronics in the cameras from the 70s and 80s won’t last forever either, nor were they ever built to.

          • Carla Mahl Kelly

            I have found that good glass from the film era is usually cheaper if you buy the whole kit, which usually includes a good manual camera. I have several bodies that I don’t use as a result: Cosina CM-5 and CM7, Pentax Spotmatic, Zenit, Yashica T4, etc. Also there’s the Canon AE-1 & T90, Leica M6, Olympus OM-1 & XA, Minolta SRT & XA, Zorki 4 & FED 4, Mamiya RZ67, Pentax K10000 & MX, Ricoh KR10 Super, and a host of others. There are tons of them, many still quite usable.

          • Robert Falconer

            Sure, there are ones starting to suffer from old age, but a number of them can be repaired. And there are plenty that were babied, too. Anyone who has owned — or currently owns — Nikon FT2s, FT3s, FMs, FM2s, F2s, Canon FTbs, Pentax Spotmatics, Minolta SRTs, etc, etc…knows how well made those mechanical cameras were. We’re not even getting into all the Leica rangefinders. Many of these cameras are repairable, albeit you might have to search for a good repair person a bit harder now. And the cameras that were babied or barely used, typically need little more than new light seals.

            Just do a quick search on eBay for mint or near-mint examples of these cameras and you will find TONS of them for sale. The cherry ones require a bit more searching—but they’re out there. That’s how well built these machines were. And I doubt this Kickstarter product will equal that level of mechanical quality.

          • Mannock

            You are right. Like my Leica M3, which is wearing and wasting away…oh, wait a minute, it’s not. After sixty years, it is still running perfectly. Like my Canon F1 and my Hasselblad 500C/M. Sorry, Zos, your comment doesn’t wash.

        • How many local repair shops are in your area? How many years do you think a camera built in the 1970’s can run with aged lubricants keeping it from destroying itself? Most avid film shooters can perform basic maintenance such as replacing light seal foam but when it comes to accurately calibrated shutters, meters and full CLA’s, a professional is needed. While many vintage cameras are up to the task of having very long lives, without proper maintenance and replacement parts, it’s only a matter of time before they become decoration.

    • Daniel Oh

      Agree. Don’t know how much it will cost but my whole collection of film cameras cost me about $200 in ebay/garage sales and it include classics like Nikon F, FM, FE, EM to Eye-controlled Canons. Hard to justify the cost. If they break I can just buy another one. Besides it is the price of film/development that stops me from using them…

      • What you really have there are a bunch of shelf queens, probably not cameras that a serious photographer could pick up and actually use regularly because they’ve all been sitting unused or used only sparingly for many years and have aged, hardened lubricants. Any regular use would wear them out or jam them soon or in a few years. You are getting these cameras at silly prices that don’t reflect, in any way, their actual value or cost to own AND use. While your scenario is common, it is not realistic or sustainable for film photography. This new SLR is for film photographers, not collectors.

    • fanboy fagz

      the bombardment of mediocre garbage on crowdfunding the last few years is unreal.

  • i will definitely purchase this camera when it comes out, so i can scan it with my d850!

  • MB

    The guy is using 55mm f1.8 Super Takumar so I presume it is m42 mount …
    As I admire the enthusiasm I can hardly see the point of such an endeavor …

  • Carla Mahl Kelly

    Weight is a double-edged sword in cameras. Many old film cameras and their lenses were all metal. So even those that aren’t that big are heavy. Photographers have, for many decades paid the price and hauled them around because they are great gear, and many people, like me, still use the lenses. The only reason I don’t use the bodies is the price of film/developing. The new gear is mostly lighter, made of plastic and lightweight metals like aluminum and magnesium and ?. But will they last? Will they break apart if I drop one? And they’re soooo expensive. What’s wrong with using what’s out there until it gets too hard to find/use and then shift to newer stuff, which, by that time, should be more developed and competitive. Just a thought. I’m strong like bull and can stand the weight. Keeps me in shape. When I feel like griping, I remember Ansel Adams dragging his Hasselblad kit up icy mountains. c:

  • Mistral75

    The Kickstarter campaign for the Reflex SLR camera will be launched on 7 November 2017.

    • yes, my update is coming soon…

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