Hasselblad X1D medium format mirrorless camera officially announced

Hasselblad-X1D
Hasselblad-X1D-camera
The Hasselblad X1D medium format mirrorless camera is now officially announced.

The X1D price is 7,900 EUR | 8,995 USD | 5,990 GBP (all prices without VAT). See the pre-order options here.

Key Hasselblad X1D features:

  • Compact, lightweight (725g), highly portable and user-friendly medium format technology
  • Large 50MP CMOS medium format sensor delivering up to 14 stops of dynamic range
  • New line of XCD lenses with integral central shutter; 45mm and 90mm available at launch
  • Compatible with all 12 lenses and lens accessories from the Hasselblad professional H System (adapter required)
  • Multiple image format options
  • High quality XGA electronic viewfinder or high resolution rear display with touch functionality
  • Wide range of shutter speeds: 60 minutes to 1/2000th sec. with full flash synchronisation throughout the range
  • An ISO range from 100 to 25,600
  • Dual SD card slots, GPS and Wi-Fi
  • USB 3.0 Type-C connector, Mini HDMI, Audio In/Out
  • Weather and dust sealings
  • HD video
  • Phocus 3.1 for simple and quick raw image processing. Adobe Photoshop® and Adobe Photoshop Lightroom® compatible.

Specifications, additional images and promo video:

Hasselblad-X1D-top-view Hasselblad-X1D-front Hasselblad-X1D-lens-front Hasselblad-X1D-back Hasselblad-X1D-side-viewHasselblad XCD lenses

Sensor type
CMOS, 50 megapixels (8272 × 6200 pixels, 5.3 × 5.3 μm)
Sensor dimensions
43.8 × 32.9mm
Image size
Stills: RAW 3FR capture 65MB on average. TIFF 8 bit: 154MB; Video: HD (1920 x 1080p)
File format
Stills: Lossless compressed Hasselblad 3FR RAW + JPEG
Video: H.264 Compressed (25 fps)
Shooting mode
Single shot stills, Video
Colour definition
16 bit; Dynamic range up to 14 stops
ISO speed range
ISO 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200, 6400, 12800 & 25600
Storage options
Dual SD card slots
Colour management
Hasselblad Natural Colour Solution
Storage capacity
16GB card holds 240 images on average
Capture rate
1.7 - 2.3 frames per second
Display
3.0 inch TFT type, 24 bit colour, 920K pixels; Touch functionality: Yes, full support Live View: On camera, host and iOS device with high frame rate (30 fps)
Histogram feedback
Yes (on rear display)
IR filter
Mounted in front of sensor
Acoustic feedback
Yes
Software
Phocus for Mac and Windows. Compatible with Adobe Photoshop Lightroom® and Adobe Camera Raw®
Platform support
Macintosh: OSX version 10.10; PC: Windows 7 / 8 / 10 (64 bit only)
Host connection type
USB 3.0 (5 Gbit/s) Type-C connector
Additional connections
Mini HDMI, Audio In/Out
Operating temperature
- 10 ̊C to + 45 ̊C / 14 – 113 ̊F
Wi-Fi & GPS
802.11a, b, g, n, ac (depending on region)
Dimensions
Camera Body only: 150 x 98 x 71 mm
Weight
725g (Camera Body and Li-ion battery)
Camera type
Mirrorless Large Sensor Medium Format
Lenses
Hasselblad XCD lenses with integral lens shutter
Shutter speed range
60 minutes to 1/2000 sec with XCD Lenses
Flash sync speed
Flash can be used at all shutter speeds
Viewfinder
2.36MP XGA Electronic Viewfinder
Focusing
Autofocus metering via contrast detection; Instant manual focus override
Flash control
Automatic TTL centre weighted system. Nikon™ compatible hotshoe
Output can be adjusted from -3.0 to +3.0 EV
Exposure metering
Spot, Centre Weighted and CentreSpot
Power supply
Rechargeable Li-ion battery (7.2 VDC/3200 mAh)

Press release:

Hasselblad announces groundbreaking X1D

The world’s first compact mirrorless digital medium format camera

Hasselblad is proud to introduce the groundbreaking X1D – weighing less than half that of a conventional digital medium format camera, the mirrorless 50MP camera is a game changer in the world of photography.

Inspired by the brand’s iconic design heritage, the camera is ergonomic and compact, offering a handling experience unlike any other. Handmade in Sweden, the X1D combines Scandinavian sensibility with beautiful performance.

Like the iconic V System, the X1D seamlessly combines portability with excellent optical quality for which the brand is renowned. Hasselblad has ingeniously introduced mirrorless technology to digital medium format for the first time ever, creating a precision performance camera that can sit in the palm of your hand. The 50MP CMOS sensor captures the finest details with true natural colours.

Commenting on the announcement Perry Oosting, Hasselblad CEO noted: “The X1D marks a pivotal point in Hasselblad’s rich 75-year history. This camera makes medium format photography available to a new generation of Hasselblad users, while pushing the existing limits of photography to new heights.”

A completely new family of dedicated autofocus lenses has been developed to support optical quality and portability, offering a wide range of shutter speeds and full flash synchronisation up to 1/2000th second.

Weighing just 725g and including HD video, Wi-Fi and built-in GPS, the X1D is a trusted partner and ideal travel companion. The robust exterior is dust and weather proof, providing durability to take with you wherever you go.

The X1D has been created with passionate photographers in mind, opening up Hasselblad to a new generation of creatives. Ideal for those who want to create the highest quality medium format images with a straightforward and easy to use camera that can fit in the palm of your hand.

The X1D is priced at 7,900 EUR / 8,995 USD / 5,990 GBP. All prices stated are exclusive of VAT.

Sample photos can be found here.

This entry was posted in Hasselblad and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink. Trackbacks are closed, but you can post a comment.
  • Hasselblad X1D data sheet:

    • stevieg

      Only 2.36MP viewfinder….
      Hmmm….

      • preston

        That is equivalent to the Sony A7r ii, so in line with the best on the market. Not sure what the “hmmm” is for.

        • Adynaton

          The best on the market is the EVF of the Leica SL (4.4 MP).

          • sperdynamite

            Only on paper. In actual use it doesn’t accurately reproduce colors and shadows are very muddy and strange looking. I’ll take a lower res but accurate EVF from Fuji or Sony over the Leica one any day.

          • MdB

            Yeah it’s a terrible TN panel, like the awful one in my E-M1 – Sony OLED based EVFs are far better (as used in GX8, A7R II, X-T1 etc).

          • Spy Black

            …and it looks like shít. sperdynamite is correct.

      • chrisgull

        Guys, it’s not MP (megapixels), it’s “megadots” manufacturers count each pixel three times. It’s only 1024×768. So 0.8 MP. The Leica SL finder is 1440×1050 I think?

    • Originaru

      Admin, any news about hi resolution samples?

    • Spy Black

      It can only take up to 16 gig SD’s? I wonder what that’s about?

      • I think it’s only an example given. There is no reason whatsoever for the camera taking only 16GB cards (as the SDHC capacity tops out at 32GB, not 16GB, but this one likely supports SDXC as well).

        • Spy Black

          Yeah, I’m not sure about that, it’s specifically listed. Seems rather odd, considering I presently have a 64-gig card in my Panasonic GM5 pocket compact M4/3 camera.

  • Alphaios

    Say whatever you want but for 7900€ this IS a game changer… I unfortunately don’t have the money for it but I’m sue many people will be happy to get into a bigger format for this price…

    • Michał Świtnicki

      What are you? Pentax 645Z is cheaper than this X1D (7000 USD):
      http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1045517-REG/pentax_16599_645z_digital_slr_camera.html
      But a form factor is different though.
      Pentax has many more pieces of glass available though.
      Cool piece of kit nevertheless.

      • MdB

        And uses a focal plane shutter, can’t sync anything like this can. Weighs twice as much.

        • Michał Świtnicki

          X1D is less than a m4/3 of medium format. 645Z is at least APS-C, if not APS-H.
          FF has area of 864mm2, X1D – 1441mm2, a 645Z is 2169mm2. Full 645 format has 2700mm2. That’s where a big difference is. X1D is only half that of regular 645 which is already the smaller variant of medium format – 67 format has 4200mm2.

          • MdB

            No, 645Z is the same sensor.

          • Michał Świtnicki

            Ops, you’re right indeed. I just checked on that.

          • MdB

            No worries. I suspect this is designed as a system for full format eventually.

            Edit: actually scratch that, it doesn’t appear to be.

          • preston

            What is the point in comparing film medium format size to digital medium format size? It would be relevant of course if the was a 6cm x 4.5cm digital sensor, but there isn’t.

          • silmasan

            Well, actual area of a “645” film is about 56x42mm Phase IQ160/180/260/280 and IQ3 for example, are very close to “full frame”.

        • sperdynamite

          Who cares? Unless you’re trying to beat the sun using strobes all day, every day. Who is really using that ‘killer app’ with a camera like the X1D? I can sync a 1/2000th with my RX1RII but I’ve used that feature exactly 0 times. That is such an overblown ‘issue’ that people always wave at the 645Z, and considering that Pentax designed and markets it as a landscape/location camera, I don’t see how it’s really a factor. It has the exact same flash and HSS capability as a Canon or Nikon, and I would bet that’s fine for a majority of users.

          • MdB

            Clearly not you. It is a considerable difference for others however.

          • sperdynamite

            Yes and they are free to spend their money on Hasselblad or Phase. There is no sense in constantly pointing out one feature or another that is missing. Neither the Phase or the Blad’s have the same weather sealing that the Pentax has, nor a flip up screen, nor a multipoint AF system. The Pentax has by far the best live view, was the first to have double card slots, and a built in 2nd tripod mount so you don’t have to buy an L bracket. These features are important to others, just as some users may also need high speed sync without HSS.

          • MdB

            You say you don’t need to point out features and then go point out a bunch of features, I smell fanboy.

            You have exactly ZERO idea about the weather sealing, live view of this camera. This camera almost certainly has a larger number and spread of AF points. It’s lighter, smaller, has live view in the viewfinder (not just the screen), offers 30fps live view to a connected device. This has dual card slots and I’m sure buying a $9k camera an L-bracket is not going to break the bank if you need one.

            So nothing there that actually affects the shots you can take with this camera vs the 645Z, leaf shutter on the other hand has a far greater impact on the actual shots you can take.

            I don’t know why you need to talk about a P1 or other Hassy cameras when comparing this to the 645Z.

          • Mike

            1/125 and 1/2000 is a big difference. Plus it’s hotshoe is Nikon compatible so you’re getting, potentially, full power pops at 1/1000 vs HSS strobe pops. Big difference. If you have a studio flash that supports HSS and has a Nikon trigger, (Profoto B1 with Air TTL for example), there are lots of creative abilities syncing at more that 1/250.

          • jar_jar_

            There are some drawbacks, but with the Priolite MBX1000, the flash sync capabilities of the 645Z improve to 1/4000. http://flashhavoc.com/priolite-hss-for-pentax/

          • dredlew

            For this camera, while the sync speed is awesome, I’d be more concerned about the 1/2000th shutter and lowest ISO of 100. In broad daylight, you’ll be reaching for that ND filter more than a few times.

          • Pat Mann

            It only takes an occasional need to justify a decision to purchase a camera that has the ability to synchronize to the full power of a flash at high shutter speed over a camera that does not. A choice often hinges on a single capability such as this.

    • preston

      Keep in mind that the lenses are going to be priced along the line of Hasselblad’s other lenses, so the system cost still won’t be comparable to 35mm dslrs. For example, the cheapest lens they make for the digital H series is the 80mm f/2.8 and it sells for $3,000. The 50mm and 35mm f/3.5 lenses each cost $4,000.

      So if you want a simple kit with the body and a 35mm, 50mm, and 80mm you need to shell out about $20,000.

      • Pat Mann

        “Price not acceptable” – then clearly they won’t be buying into medium format. But the price penalty is getting smaller, and this camera looks very usable, and seems like a good value provided the lens range is expanded with just a few more basic focal lengths. There are many reasons why the higher prices are justified in the marketplace. The higher unit prices resulting from smaller production runs over which to distribute design and manufacturing setup costs, larger components, in-lens shutters all contribute to the cost side. High quality, higher resolution output produces more value that justifies the higher price to many.

        • preston

          Completely agree. This makes getting into medium format more accessible for a lot of people. I was just reminding people that cost of entry to this system is a lot more than just the cost of the body (compared to a a 35mm dslr where you can get a nifty fifty for around $200).

  • Alphaios

    Wait a second, does this say “handmade in sweden”??? For 7900 am amazed!!

    • Jeffry De Meyer

      Maybe you heard about all those disappearing economic migrants in Sweden

  • markdstump

    6×6 is about 4x the area of 36×24.
    This is 1.7 x…hardly Medium Format.
    They should call it 35mm+ 🙂

    • JL

      There is no commercially available 6×6 sensor to date. The new 100 MP Sony sensor is one of the first to cover the traditional 645 size. Most digital medium format has been like this. Leica S is even smaller.

      • markdstump

        I know (not the Sony part, I didn’t know that). I do have hope it’ll get better.

    • preston

      It is the same sensor size as the ‘medium format’ Pentax 645d/z and half of the ‘medium format’ Phase One and Hasselblad digital backs out there (the other half are slightly larger but still smaller than all common film medium format sizes). You just have to understand that digital medium format is different than film medium format.

      • markdstump

        I say the same think about the Pentax, and the others.

        I say the same thing about APS-c

        I don’t have to understand or accept, I can continue to bitch about it.

    • chrisgull

      As others mentioned the convention is to call anything bigger than 24x36mm medium format.

      Why no 6×6 (56x56mm)? Manufacturing cost per sensor is said to increase with the square of the area, given the same manufacturing volume. Add to that much smaller series and cost can easily reach astronomical levels.

    • Mike

      Well, FF is 1.5x bigger than APS-C and there is quite a difference there. So at 1.7x bigger than FF, expect good things. If it does 16bit RAW as its big brothers do….. woof.

      • Pat Mann

        A typical full frame sensor has about 2.3 times the area of the D500 APS-C sensor (Canon APS-C is smaller). The difference from APS-C to full frame is substantially greater than the difference from full frame to this sensor, but it’s certainly enough to make a difference.

        • markdstump

          2.5

          • Pat Mann

            The D500 sensor is 15.7mm x 23.5mm for an area of 369 square millimeters per Nikon’s published specifications. The D5 sensor is 23.9 x 35.6mm for an area of 858 square millimeters per Nikon’s specifications. The ratio of these areas is 1:2.33, not 1:2.5.

          • markdstump

            My mistake. Going Senile.
            I should have written 2.25:
            36×24/(16×24) = 36/16 =2 4/16 =2.25

      • markdstump

        FF is 2.5 x the area of APS-c
        Of course it should be better(ish)
        but think how nice it’d be to have something twice as large again.

  • Adynaton

    Hello Leica

    • Spy Black

      I think they’re really saying “Hello Phase One”…

      • JL

        Phase One has the Alpa “mirrorless” camera. 100 MP and beautifully made, but not nearly as compact as this. 😉

  • Spy Black

    Hassleblad making cameras they know something about, who’s of thought…

  • nwcs

    It’s big and beefy (for a mirrorless) but I do like it. I’m not in the market for one but may rent one next year for fun. See what the fuss is about 🙂

    • preston

      Not considering that it has a larger sensor. Sony A7r is 625g. Multiply that by the 1.2x crop factor for this Hassy and you get 750g (slightly more than the Hassy’s 725g).

      • nwcs

        It’s still pretty big and beefy for a mirrorless. It wasn’t a criticism but an observation.

        • MdB

          Looks almost exactly the same the SL, which is yes, big and beefy for a mirrorless.

          But MF DSLRs are big and beefy for a DSLR.

        • preston

          You wouldn’t want this camera to be smaller because then it wouldn’t balance well with the large lenses.

          Sure, if you want smaller then that’s fine of course but the way you phrased the original comment made it sound like this being the size of a Nikon D750 was a bad thing.

  • Hubby de Harman

    I’m excited, I’m exited, I’m excited, I can’t afford it, I’m excited, I’m excited, I’m excited, electronic shutter? I’m excited, did I say I’m excited? I’m excited…

  • Ric of The LBC

    Time for a HassyAddict page.

    • preston

      check up on it once or twice a year to get the one or 2 announcements/rumors.

      • Ric of The LBC

        but it would give a dedicated page to bitch and complain.

        • preston

          good point 🙂

    • hehe, maybe one day 🙂

  • sickheadache

    Display
    3.0 inch TFT type, 24 bit colour, 920K pixels; a wee bit…low..for that price..and 1.3 megadots…on D810.

    • preston

      That is a perfectly fine display. Nothing to complain about.

      • sickheadache

        One would think..clocking in at 9 Grand…and being 50 Medium Sony Sensor’d format…that the rear screen would be one of the best…to view the best ever…but me thinking..it is woefully low resolution.

        • jake337

          You’ll probably just want to turn the rear screen off anyways to conserve battery life.

          It is a mirrorless ya know.

  • Whoa, only 725g…and it looks pretty thin in the photo. My desire for something like this just went up a bit. Still out of my price range for now, but if it eventually drops to $5,000~ after a few years….

    • MdB

      Not ‘if’, ‘when’.

  • I don’t what it’s like to use or what the files are realy like, but from a design pov I like it, reminds me of the Mamiya 7 II.

    • chrisgull

      I agree – similar form factor.

  • chrisgull

    Very cool indeed. Add some more lenses and third-party adapters (Hasselblad PLEASE keep the system open!) and this might be a volume seller (for MF). This in turn could reduce per/unit sensor cost.

    Glad to see that Hasselblad has not lost its ways.

  • jmb2560

    Do we know if the sensor is “Bayer-free”?

    • Jeffry De Meyer

      if you are asking they opted for some other color filter pattern they would have been blowing insane amounts of BS out of their ass about their supposed better system like Fuji does.

      they aren’t so no.

  • sickheadache

    This should help you guys…Medium VS FF….

    • Sakaphoto Graphics

      Oh no, 135 Format looks small somehow…and the dynamic range…

  • Duncan Dimanche

    Yeah I do feel like the 44mmx33mm sensor is a bit small.. It doesn’t feel like a huge step up from a full frame…. nice looking camera nonetheless

  • TheInconvenientRuth

    So the body size is a little smaller than D810 body in size and weight. The lenses look to be the same size and weight as Nikon 1.4 primes. Might be worth a serious test drive for studio/landscape work, depending on the upcoming lens line-up. I’m not a big fan of adapters, no matter how well made.

    • TheInconvenientRuth

      Hold on, I can use my iPad Mini III as a viewfinder/screen through the built-in Wifi? Did I read that correctly?

  • Sebastian

    Quite surprising that they managed to develop this thing so quickly. I presume they only started working on serious cameras after the new CEO came in and ditched the Sony-rebranding approach.

  • Pat Mann

    Beautiful! Can’t wait for the 20mm Biogon.

  • Back to top