DxO ONE camera attachment for iPhone now available for pre-order, shipping starts on October 1st

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The DXO ONE camera attachment for iPhone that was announced back in June is now available for purchase (pre-order) at:

Shipping will start on October 1st. Here are the DXO ONE technical specifications:

  • 1″ 20.2 MP sensor (3.2x8.8mm)
  • Sensor Type: CMOS - BSI
  • Still Resolution (5406X3604)
  • 1080p/30fps Video Resolution 720p/120fps
  • Focal Length: 11.9mm (equivalent to 32mm in full frame)
  • Lens cover: Integrated, sliding (on/off)
  • Aperture: f/1.8 adjustable down to f/11 (6 blade iris)
  • Shutter button: 2-stage
  • OLED Settings display, touch control
  • Iso Range: From ISO 100 to ISO 51200 (Hi 2)
  • Shutter Speed: From 1/8000 to 15s
  • Image Stabilization: Electronic (for video)
  • Camera modes: Auto, Sports, Portrait, Landscape, Night, Program, Aperture Priority, Speed Priority, Manual, Selfie
  • Video modes: 1080p (30 fps), 720p (120fps)
  • File formats: .JPG, .DNG, .DxO (SuperRAW™), .MOV (H.264)
  • Focus range: 20cm - infinity
  • Autofocus: Contrast detect, using face-detection
  • Focus modes: Single-shot, continuous, tap-to-focus
  • Metering modes: Spot, center weighted, multi-zone
  • Zoom: Digital 3x
  • Micro USB port
  • USB 2 (power charging, mass storage connection)
  • Lightning connector: Retractable/collapsible, +/- 60º rotation
  • Screen size: Varies, function of connected iDevice between 4” and 9.7”
  • Screen resolution: Varies, function of connected iDevice between 727,040 and 3,145,728 dots
  • Storage type: microSD UHS-I U3 (not included)
  • Orientation: Gyroscope + accelerometer
  • Battery type: Integrated lithium ion
  • Battery life: ~200 photos
  • Weight: 3.8oz (108g)
  • Dimensions: 67.5 x 48.85 x 26.25 mm
  • Compatible with: iPhone 6 Plus, iPhone 6, iPhone 5s, iPhone 5c, iPhone 5, iPad Air 2, iPad mini 3, iPad Air, iPad mini 2, iPad (4th gen), iOS 8 or later
  • Price: $599

DXO ONE related videos:

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  • Oompsy

    I honestly don’t see the point of this thing. The quality doesn’t seem that superior to that of cell phones’ anyway, and it’s awkward and cumbersome to use. May as well just use a wifi-enabled camera and sync with the phone.

    • Karim Ghantous

      I’ll play devil’s advocate. 🙂 The sensor is bigger than a phone’s sensor, while keeping to a relatively modest pixel count (although I think 16Mpx would have been better).

      I have a 5S and have seen output from the 6. Those sensors are the best you’ll find at that size, but the image falls apart upon enlargement.

      This is no more expensive than a Sony RX100 II (that’s the kind of camera that’s a great compromise between size and quality). Of course the Sony has one advantage: a zoom lens. However, I am sure that you will be able to buy telephoto attachments for the DxO in the near future. And the DxO is much smaller than a compact camera.

      So, is it worth it? It depends on how good the output is compared to something like an RX100. I am skeptical of the ergonomics, but I can’t say for sure until I hold one.

      • Piooof

        It’s apparently the same sensor as in the RX100III. Plus there’s bundled DxO software to post-process the raw images. I’ve no doubt that the result is better than RX100III. But… there’s no zoom, no exchangeable battery, and handling will never be as convenient as with a standard camera. For me it’s a trade-off between size (you can have a ONE in your pocket all the time) and function. IQ is out of the question.

      • a-traveler

        **”I have a 5S and have seen output from the 6. Those sensors are the best you’ll find at that size, but the image falls apart upon enlargement.”**

        The back cover of the last issue of Rolling Stone magazine has a iPhone Ad with a full page photo. The photo looks as good as full page ads I’ve shot with a Canon 5D3. BTW magazine are printed at about 150 dpi.

        • Piooof

          Great, but there are pictures a phone will never be able to shoot. How do you control depth of field with a tiny iPhone sensor? You can blur a background with the ONE and its 1″ sensor at f/1.8 aperture. Not with an iPhone.

          • a-traveler

            Most of my advertising work is shot at f/8 to f/16 on a Canon 5D3. I also use a 90mm f/2.8 Tilt & Shift to INCREASE the DOF.

            BTW shallow DOF can be done with an App. Now you just need someone to code the App for you.

          • Piooof

            Blurring backgrounds in software means proper masking, and that can be both tricky and time-consuming.
            And similarly you can deal with your phone high ISO noise in software but quality will be miles away from what you’ll get (say at ISO 1600) from a 1″ sensor.

            The real competitor for ONE is not the iPhone 6 but the Olympus AIR, or Sony QX series & RX100III/IV. All pocketable, but not the same size.

          • a-traveler

            **”Blurring backgrounds in software means proper masking, and that can be both tricky and time-consuming.”**

            No big deal with the latest software. For my retoucher, it’s child’s play.

            **”And similarly you can deal with your phone high ISO noise in software but quality will be miles away from what you’ll get (say at ISO 1600) from a 1″ sensor.”**

            Why would I shoot at ISO 1600?? Either Sunlight or HMIs will allow me to shoot at native ISO.

  • markz

    surprised there’s no optical stabilisation. The iPhone 6Plus has optical stabilisation, so do some ultra compact pocket cameras so it’s not a case of not enough space in the DxO’s lens assembly.
    Pity, I’m curious about this unit but that absence could be the “maybe not” to dissuade me from all the “maybe wills”

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